Continuing Education For NC General Contractors

H.B.162 has been approved by the General Assembly of North Carolina to amend Article 1 of Chapter 87 of the General Statutes.  What does this mean for GC’s in North Carolina?  A new section has been added: 87-10.2 Continuing Education. 

This new section outlines the requirement for eight hours of continuing education on an annual basis, beginning with the 2020 renewal year, for at least one qualifier or qualifying party of a licensee.  

We’ll post additional information later this year, as the new General Contractor CE program details are released to CE Providers.

NC Electrical License Eligibility Requirements Have Changed

Effective October, 2018 the exam eligibility requirements for all NC Electrical Licenses have been reduced so click here to visit the Electrical Board’s site to see if you now qualify for the Limited, Intermediate or Unlimited exams.

Examination applicants must meet the following requirements for the specified license classifications:

1) Limited classification. An applicant must have at least two years of experience,

2) Intermediate classification. An applicant must have at least four years of experience,

3) Unlimited classification. An applicant must: A) have at least five years of experience, as defined in Rule .0202 of this Section, of which at least four years shall be primary experience.

4) SP-PH plumbing and heating classification. An applicant must have at least two years of experience, of which at least one year shall be primary experience. The balance of experience may be primary, secondary or both.

To read more, refer to page 30 of the Electrical Board’s Exam Information Handbook for details.

Hope this information was helpful, see you in class soon!

SP-PH Electrical License Eligibility Requirements Have Changed

You’re now eligible to test for the Limited Electrical SP-PH License with two years of field experience in HVAC or plumbing! Before 2019, you needed three years to qualify.

Next class date is Friday, July 26th in Raleigh at the Trane DSO, click here to register for the one-day class, we’ll begin preparing your license application for you.  Only reference book required for the class and 40-question exam is the 2017 National Electrical Code.

2018 NC Building Code Information – August 2018

In the January, 2018 edition of the Engineering Newsletter, the NC Department of Insurance published an article titled ‘Update on 2018 NC Building Code’. According to the update, the 2018 plumbing and mechanical codes will go into full effect on January 1, 2019.

Contractors who wish to begin using the new code may do so as early as July 1, 2018, with either the 2012 or 2018 codes being acceptable for the six month period of July 1—December 31, 2018. The new code books are now available for purchase.

The new exam material, based on the 2018 codes, will become effective on January 1, 2019. If you are taking an exam prior to December 31, 2018, you will need to use the 2012 codes as a reference. If you are taking an exam after January 1, 2019, you will need to use the 2018 codes. Applicants who fail an exam must wait at least 90 days to retest.  If you fail an exam before the cutoff date (12/31/2018) using the 2012 code, and then retest after the cutoff date(01/01/2019), you will need the new 2018 codebooks.

As a reminder, all examinees must bring reference materials to the exam site, and the materials will be inspected to ensure that they meet the Board’s established requirements. You may click here to read the reference material requirements.

HVAC Partial Replacements

HVAC Partial Replacements - Misquoting or Siting Non-Existent Code

by Mike Causey, Commissioner of Insurance, NC Department of Insurance

I have had a steady stream of calls in especially the past six months from homeowners who want clarification on the code and an interpretation that NCDOI issued on the topic of partial replacement of HVAC equipment. The conversation usually contains the following phrase:

“I was told NC is one of only two states in the nation that requires the replacement of all components on split system hvac systems if either the indoor or outdoor section breaks” This is causing me hardship because my home warranty will only cover a partial system…

The extra-confusing thing about this statement being told to NC residents is that we, NC DOI, have a web interpretation that specifically details the non-requirement for replacing both the indoor and outdoor unit if only one component goes bad. We clarify that when a partial replacement is performed, the units do not need to be AHRI matched, but do need to be compatible. Compatible is defined in the on-line interpretation, use the link below for more information:

Link to Partial Replacement Interpretation